Out There: From 320 Pounds to Pro Athlete.


One Man’s True Story of Ultra Recovery From Alcohol, Drugs and Obesity

It’s no surprise that, for many, New Year’s resolutions have already fallen by the wayside. However giving up won’t get us any closer to achieving our goals. Just ask David Clark, a former 320-pound alcoholic, turned pro athlete. Clark’s hard-hitting autobiography, Out There: A Story of Ultra Recovery, proves that persistence and a strong desire will pave the way for success.

The Superman Project

Meet David Clark. He grew up poor and homeless, living out of his father’s pickup truck. With no formal education to build upon, he beat the odds. He went from being homeless to owning a chain of 13 retail stores by the time he was 29 years old. However his success was short-lived and he ultimately lost everything due to poor choices and addiction. He had hit rock bottom from reckless eating, binge drinking and popping pills.

Miraculously, reality hit him with the realization that if he didn’t change his ways on that very day, he would surely die. From that day onwards, David drew a line in the sand, leaving his addictions and unhealthy lifestyle in the past. His remarkable journey and refusal to give up, is described as “raw and riveting.”

At 320 pounds and with this new resolve, he started training for the Ultra Marathon, an extreme racing event where runners attempt a grueling 100-mile trek through the Colorado terrain. Runners are allowed a mere 30 hours to complete the race. Not only did he conquer the course in under 30 hours on his first attempt, but he lost more than 150 pounds, and beat his drug addictions. Further, he has competed in and won some of the toughest endurance events in the world. He now uses Ultra sports to help others conquer their own demons.

“If you want to see the world’s greatest athletes, watch an Ironman Triathlon,” says Clark. “The ‘ultra’ world, in contrast, isn’t about outperforming the other participants. It consists mostly of runners who push themselves to the brink of failure in an effort to measure the depth of their own strength.”

Nowadays, David Clark spends his time as a running coach, sponsored runner, inspirational speaker, and gym owner.

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